Dissident AIDS Database

Co-factorsRecreational drugsDrug EpidemicCocaine
The Drug-AIDS Hypothesis
 Duesberg Peter, Rasnick David
  (US) The director of NIDA wrote in 1985, "Over the past 10 years, cocaine ... has evolved from a relatively minor problem into a major public health threat." (NIDA Research Monograph Series, NIDA US Department HHS (eds.) US Dept. HHS, 1985; Cocaine use in America: epidemiological and clinical perspectives). The new cocaine epidemic has since increased more than 10-fold, raising the numbers of cocaine patients to 80,355 cases in 1990, and 123,423 in 1993 and 142,878 in 1994 (What We Are Getting for Our Federal Drug Control Dollars. Drug Strategies, Washington DC, 1995, Drug Strategies. Keeping score, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Annual Medical Examiner data, Data from the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN), 1-82, 1994, Office of National Drug Control Policy, Drugs & Crime Data, Drugs & Crime Clearinghouse, July 1996). By 1996 the number of regular cocaine users had reached 3.6 million, with 28 million who had at least tried the drug once in their lifetime (Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Dept. of Justice, Washington DC, Drugs, crime, and the justice system, 1992, Office of National Drug Control Policy, Drugs & Crime Data, Drugs & Crime Clearinghouse, July 1996). In 1986 scientists from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) published an epidemiological overview of drug use in the US in Science. According to the NIDA scientists cocaine addiction spiraled in the US from "negligible" numbers in 1973 to 9,946 non-fatal and 580 fatal medical cases in 1985 (Kozel NJ, Adams EH, Science 1986; 234: 970-974. Epidemiology of drug abuse: An overview)
  Continuum Feb./March 19971997