Dissident AIDS Database

HIVIsolationDifficulty in isolating HIVRetrovirus particles
Viruslike particles in human breast cancer.
 Chopra, H. C. & Feller, W. F.,
  Although the origin and role of "retrovirus particles" are not known, they are considered ubiquitous and this is especially the case in cell cultures and in pathological tissue. In 1969, Chopra et al, noticing that "Viruslike particles resembling the C-type [some classify HIV as a C-type] particles associated with mouse leukemia have been reported in human leukemic tissues by a number of investigators" reported that: "These particles have been observed in the density gradient purified fractions of milk samples obtained from women having breast cancer and from milk of a normal woman with a family history of breast cancer. A few particles have also been detected in tissue-culture of a breast cancer biopsy". => particles with morphological characteristics ascribed to HIV are not specific to this virus.
  Texas Rep. Biol. Med. 1969. 27:945-953.1969
Relationship between clinical status of leukemic patients and virus-like particles in their plasma.
 Levine, P. H., Horoszewicz, J. S., Grace, J. T., Chai, L. S., Ellison, R. R. & Holland, J. F.,
  Although the origin and role of "retrovirus particles" are not known, they are considered ubiquitous and this is especially the case in cell cultures and in pathological tissue. Levine et al reported that "Of 45 patients with myelocytic leukemia, five with acute and four with chronic myelocytic leukemia showed multiple virus-like particles (double-membraned particles with dense nucleoid which were about 100uu in diameter and comparable to the type C particles described by Porter and Dalton)" => particles with morphological characteristics ascribed to HIV are not specific to this virus.
  Cancer 20:1563-1577. 1967.1967
Spontaneous transformation of human brain cells grown in vitro and description of associated virus particles.
 Hooks, J., Gibbs, C. J., Chopra, H., Lewis, M. & Gajdusek, D. C
  Although the origin and role of "retrovirus particles" are not known, they are considered ubiquitous and this is especially the case in cell cultures and in pathological tissue. In 1972, virus-like particles with morphological characteristics similar to those ascribed to HIV by some researchers (Lentiviruses), were reported in cultures of human brain cells => particles with morphological characteristics ascribed to HIV are not specific to this virus.
  Science 176:1420-1422. 1972.1972
Oncornavirus-like particles in HeLa cells. II. Immunological characterization of the virus.
 Bauer, H., Daams, J. H., Watson, K. F., Molling, K., Gelderblom, H. & Schafer, W.
  Although the origin and role of "retrovirus particles" are not known, they are considered ubiquitous and this is especially the case in cell cultures and in pathological tissue. By 1974, researchers from the Koch-Institute in Germany including Gelderblom reported virus-like particles in HeLa cells, and Canadian researchers reported the same particles in cultures of marrow cells from leukaemic patients => In conclusion, particles with morphological characteristics ascribed to HIV are not specific to this virus.
  Int. J. Cancer 13:254-261. 1974.1974
Particles with characteristics of leukoviruses in cultures of marrow cells from leukemic patients in remission and relapse.
 Mak, T. W., Manaster, J., Howatson, A. F., McCullough, E. A. & Till, J. E.,
  Although the origin and role of "retrovirus particles" are not known, they are considered ubiquitous and this is especially the case in cell cultures and in pathological tissue. By 1974, researchers from the Koch-Institute in Germany including Gelderblom reported virus-like particles in HeLa cells, and Canadian researchers reported the same particles in cultures of marrow cells from leukaemic patients => particles with morphological characteristics ascribed to HIV are not specific to this virus.
  Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 71:4336-4340. 1974.1974
Oncornavirus-like particles in HeLa cells. III. Biochemical characterization of the virus.
 Watson, K. F., Molling, K., Gelderblom, H. & Bauer, H.,
  Although the origin and role of "retrovirus particles" are not known, they are considered ubiquitous and this is especially the case in cell cultures and in pathological tissue. By 1974, researchers from the Koch-Institute in Germany including Gelderblom reported virus-like particles in HeLa cells, and Canadian researchers reported the same particles in cultures of marrow cells from leukaemic patients => In conclusion, particles with morphological characteristics ascribed to HIV are not specific to this virus.
  Int. J. Cancer 13:262-267. 1974.1974