Dissident AIDS Database

Politico-socio-economicoFundingAIDS / other diseasesAfrica
Bridging the Gaps: The World Health Report 1995
 WHO
  During the past years, as the external financing of HIV-based AIDS programs in Africa dramatically increased, money for studying other health sectors remained static, even though deaths from malaria, tuberculosis, neo-natal tetanus, respiratory diseases and diarrhea grew at alarming rates.
  World Health Organization, (Geneva: WHO, 1995)1995
Impact of insecurity, the AIDS epidemic, and poverty on population health: disease patterns and trends in Northern Uganda
 S Accorsi, M Fabiani, M Lukwiya, M Ravera, A Costanzi, L Ojom, E Paze, F Manenti, P Anguzu, MG Dente, AND S Declich
  Results of an analysis of 186131 inpatients admitted to 6 ugandan hospitals during 1992-1998 : “in all hospitals, malaria was the leading cause of admissions for malaria and the frequency of admissions for malaria showed the greatest increase. Other conditions, such as malnutrition and injuries, mainly increased in the sites affected by civil conflict and massive population displacement. Tuberculosis accounted for the highest burden on hospital services (approximately ¼ of the total bed-days), though it showed a stable trend over time. A stable trend was also observed for AIDS, which is in contrast to the hypothesis that AIDS patients have displaced other patients in recent years. Conclusion : preventable and/or treatable communicable diseases, mainly those related to poverty and poor hygiene, represent the leading causes of admission and death…”
  Am j trop med hyg 2001, march-apr, 64(3-4), 214-222002
Fighting Disease, Fostering Development: The World Health Report 1996
 WHO
  During the past years, as the external financing of HIV-based AIDS programs in Africa dramatically increased, money for studying other health sectors remained static, even though deaths from malaria, tuberculosis, neo-natal tetanus, respiratory diseases and diarrhea grew at alarming rates.
  World Health Organization, (Geneva: WHO, 1996)1996
AIDS in Africa, In Search of the Truth
 Malan Rian
  "Labs and universities depend on grants, and grantmaking is fickle, subject to the vagaries of politics and intellectual fashion, and prone to favor scientists whose work grips the popular imagination. Every disease has champions who gather the data and proclaim the threat it poses. The cancer fighters will tell you that their crisis is deepening, and more research money is urgently needed. Those doing battle with malaria make similar pronouncements, as do those working on TB, and so on, and so on. If all their claims are added together, you wind up with a theoretical global death toll that "exceeds the number of humans who die annually by two- to threefold," said Christopher Murray, a World Health Organization director. Malaria kills around 2 million humans a year, roughly the same number as AIDS, but malaria research currently gets only a fraction of the resources devoted to AIDS. Tuberculosis (1.7 million victims a year) is similarly sidelined, to the extent that there were no new TB drugs in development at all as of 1998. AIDS, on the other hand, is replete, employing an estimated 100,000 scientists, sociologists, caregivers, counselors, peer educators and stagers of condom jamborees. "
  RollingStone magazine, November 22, 20012001