Dissident AIDS Database

Politico-socio-economicoLobbyingMedia coverageCDC's scare campaign
Sex in America: A Definitive Survey
 Michael Robert T. , Gagnon John H. , Laumann Edward and Kolata Gina
  Convinced that "there is not and very unlikely ever will be a heterosexual AIDS epidemic in this country," the authors acknowledge that it could be "more difficult to raise research funds for a disease that is not a threat to most Americans," but insisted it was "better to tell the truth than to behave like scaremongers, telling the country that a disaster will soon strike us all, no matter what the data say."
  Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 19941994
A CRITICAL REAPPRAISAL OF AFRICAN AIDS RESEARCH AND WESTERN SEXUAL STEREOTYPES
 Geshekter Charles
  The CDC believed that exaggerating the risks to the entire American population was the only way to drum up widespread support for measures and funding to combat AIDS. Thus, the theme of its public service ad campaign launched in 1987 was, "If I can get AIDS, anyone can." (Bennett Amanda and Sharpe Anita, AIDS Fight is Skewed by Federal Campaign Exaggerating Risks, Wall Street Journal (May 1, 1996), Boldt David R, Aiding AIDS: The Story of a Media Virus, Forbes Media Critic (Fall 1996))
  www.virusmyth.net/aids/data/cgstereotypes.htm1999